greek verb conjugations & endings: an introduction

Greek verbs are divided into two Groups.

Grammatically they are called ~ Conjugations ~
but for simplicity’s sake, let’s call them Groups.


GROUP A

with verbs like γράφω, μαθαίνω, νομίζω, καταλαβαίνω

GROUP B

with verbs like αγαπώ, μιλώ, μπορώ, θεωρώ


Why are these verbs divided?
Because of where their stress mark falls.

For the first person singular (εγώ, I ) in the Present Tense,

GROUP A verbs have their accent on the penultimate syllable: γρά·φω
GROUP B verbs get the accent on the last syllable: α·γα·πώ


Same with 

μα·θαί·νω / μι·λώ

νο·μί·ζω / μπο·ρώ

κα·τα·λα·βαί·νω / θε·ω·ρώ



GROUP B is in itself divided into two subgroups:


GROUP B1  is the -άω / ώ verbs
αγαπ
άω / αγαπώ, μιλάω / μιλώ


GROUP B2
  the just -ώ verbs
μπορώ , αργώ


All these have their own endings,

presented in a super neat table right here:

A

B1 άω / ώ

B2 ώ

γράφ

γράφ

γράφ

γράφ

γράφ

γράφ

ω

εις

ει

ουμε

ετε

ουν

αγαπ
αγαπ

αγαπ

αγαπ

αγαπ

αγαπ

άω

άς

ά(ει)

άμε

άτε

άνε/ούν

μπορ

μπορ

μπορ

μπορ

μπορ

μπορ

ώ

είς

εί

ούμε

είτε

ούν


 

As you can see, A and B2 endings are identical, with their only difference being the accent's placement. They are presented separately because each group forms its tenses (past, future) and voices (passive, active) slightly differently.


Keep in mind that the tables above are the endings for the Present Tense in the Active Voice. The Passive Voice lives here.



So when you see α new verb in -ώ, like ~ γελώ ~

is there a way to know whether it's in group B1 or B2?


Uuuh, not exactly.
The 'I' form doesn't give much away, so it's always good to have a look at the rest of the verb's declension (the you, he, we, them forms) to see how it behaves and where it belongs.

Most Group B verbs do fall in the Β1 άω / ώ category anyway, so
chances are, that's what it will be.

YAY,
VERBS!

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